Skip to content

Jia Liu: Interpreting and Translation, Lessons I Have Learned along My Career Path

30 November 2016

aaeaaqaaaaaaaamxaaaajgi4n2yyzjm3lwexzjetndjhzc1inwuylwjln2nhzwuzmjzjzq

Centre for Education Research and Scholarship
Interpreting and Translation Seminars
Middlesex University5 December 2016, 19:30, Room W147 (Williams Building) 

Jia Liu (Middlesex University): Interpreting and Translation, Lessons I Have Learned along My Career Path

Lessons I have learned along my career path since 2007. What is it like to try to pursue two career paths in parallel, strive to keep my goals in sight and survive in a competitive reality? I hope my story will give you some ideas on which way to go and what key qualities will help to push you ahead. Having spent a total of nine years in the corporate world and the field of translation, I recently started a new adventure and set out to work as a freelance translator and interpreter. Apart from freelancing, I have been providing language-specific tuition to undergraduate and postgraduate students on translation programmes at Middlesex University. In my spare time, I am a volunteer translator for the website Watching America and also publish on LinkedIn Pulse.

For further information please contact Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader: a.longo@mdx.ac.uk

Alan Peacock – An overview of the NRCPD: enhancing public protection and professional recognition

30 November 2016

2f98ab6

Centre for Education Research and Scholarship
Interpreting and Translation Seminars
Middlesex University5 December 2016, 18:30, Room W147 (Williams Building) 

Alan Peacock, NRCPD Director and Registrar: An overview of the National Registers of Communication Professionals working with Deaf and Deafblind People (NRCPD): enhancing public protection and professional recognition

NRCPD is the UK voluntary regulator for communication professionals working with deaf and deafblind people. As a voluntary regulator, its key purpose is to act in the public interest by: keeping registers of practitioners who meet agreed standards of practice in their work; setting the standards that practitioners need to meet to get onto and then stay on the register; requiring registered practitioners to abide by a Code of Conduct; and investigating complaints about alleged breaches of the Code. NRCPD Director and Registrar, Alan Peacock, will give an overview of NRCPD’s work and its aims for the future.”

For further information please contact Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader: a.longo@mdx.ac.uk

Daniel Tomozeiu: Intercultural Communication for Translators

2 November 2016

Centre for Education Research and Scholarship

Interpreting and Translation Seminars

Middlesex University

 

Dr Daniel Tomozeiu

Dr Daniel Tomozeiu

 

7 November 2016, 19:30, Room W156 (Williams Building)

Dr Daniel Tomozeiu (University of Westminster): Intercultural Communication for Translators

The talk will focus on the understanding the what intercultural competence means for translators and how it can be conceptualized. The practical side will be developed using the materials produced under Promoting Intercultural Competence in Translators (PICT, www.pictllp.eu). The project identified three different dimensions (theoretical, textual and interpersonal) which all have to be considered by professional translators. A short contextualization of the competence model with references to other similar approaches will be included. Given the practical focus of this competences model, the talk will end with ideas on the operationalization of the PICT approach and how junior translators can develop this set of competences.

Dr Daniel Tomozeiu is a Senior Lecturer in Intercultural Communication at the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Westminster. He teaches intercultural and institutional communication on undergraduate, postgraduate and professional courses. In the period 2011-2013 Daniel coordinated, together with two colleagues, the EU-funded Promoting Intercultural Competence in Translators project (www.pictllp.eu). His research interests relate to intercultural competence in translators, interpreters and communicators- including internalized and institutional culture, audience visualization techniques, social positioning and identity issues. His research focuses on current professional practice as well as pedagogical aspects.

**

For further information please contact Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader, a.longo@mdx.ac.uk

Matthias Postel: Supporting and Developing Language Professionals – Industry and careers, professional qualifications and membership

2 November 2016

Centre for Education Research and Scholarship

Interpreting and Translation Seminars

Middlesex University

 

Matthias Postel

Matthias Postel

7 November 2016, 18:30, Room W156 (Williams Building)

Matthias Postel (Business Development Manager at London’s Institute of Linguists Educational Trust – IoLET): Supporting and Developing Language Professionals – Industry and careers, professional qualifications and membership 

The talk will provide an overview of the language services industry and the relationships of translators and interpreters to it. It will focus on career paths, including work in public services settings and provide an overview of CIOL as a professional body and how it supports language professionals through professional qualifications and membership, as well as our role of maintaining the Register of Chartered Linguists in the public interest.

 

**

For further information please contact Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader, a.longo@mdx.ac.uk

Challenging Public Perceptions: Diverse Dramaturgies, Processes and Audiences

2 November 2016

avatar_ec28a41d5bf2_512

 

We would like to invite you to join us for a round-table event called ‘Challenging Public Perceptions: Diverse Dramaturgies, Processes and Audiences’, organised by the Directing and Dramaturgy Research Cluster. It will address the topic of diversity in the theatre from different perspectives, asking if and how diverse dramaturgies work to challenge, oppose or perhaps reinforce and confirm established tropes of public perception and discourse.

We believe it will be a very stimulating debate! The speakers in the round-table are:

Mojisola Adebayo – actor, playwright, director, producer, teacher

Pippa Hill – literary manager, Royal Shakespeare Company

Fin Kennedy – playwright; artistic director, Tamasha

R. M. Sanchez-Camus – live artist, scenographer, performer

The event will be on Tuesday, November 8th, 2016, from 3pm to 5pm and will be divided in two parts: approximately 90 minutes for the round-table per se, followed by 30 minutes for questions from the audience. It will take place in the Grove Concert Room (G274).

The round-table will be open to the public, live-streamed over the internet and recorded for archive purposes. It is free of charge, but booking is essential. Our box office can be found here: http://www.theatreartsmdx.org/diverse-dramaturgies.

Best wishes,

Kate Lane, Abele Longo, Ian Saville, Pedro de Senna

on behalf of the Directing and Dramaturgy Research Cluster

Middlesex Interpreting and Translation students visit the EU Directorate General for Interpretation and the EU Directorate General for Translation in Brussels

31 May 2016

Photo 2

A group of second-year Middlesex University BA Interpreting and Translation students, accompanied by Edgar Schroder, Director of Interpreting and Translation programmes, and Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader, visited the Directorate-General for Interpretation (DG Interpretation, AKA SCIC) and the Directorate-General for Translation (DG Translation), which are part of the European Commission in Brussels, between 25 and 28 May 2016.

As a multilingual organisation communicating in 24 official languages, the various EU institutions and bodies require an enormous amount of interpreting and translation work to support and strengthen multilingual communication within the EU (and with the outside world). The EU institutions are therefore one of the world’s largest employers of interpreters and translators, and the various language transfer activities necessary to ensure effective multilingual communication have become an important field of research. Obtaining more insight into the work of the EU’s interpreting and translation services and relevant training as well as career opportunities were reasons enough for Middlesex University’s Interpreting and Translation Student Society to suggest and, together with academic staff, organise a three-day study visit to Brussels.

On Thursday 26 May, the group was welcomed by Kristina Van Balen, Programme Manager for DG Interpretation Study Visits, and met with Cathy Pearson, Deputy Head of the DG Interpretation English Unit, and Marta Kakol, Project Officer of the DG Interpretation E-Learning Unit. Cathy Pearson offered a fascinating insight into the work of interpreting practitioners within DG Interpretation, providing information on the general working conditions, how the work is structured and organised, and what particular challenges interpreters are faced with in their day-to-day duties. She also outlined the training and professional development activities run by DG Interpretation and talked about the competitions and tests set for applicants to DG Interpretation.

Marta Kakol provided an insight into the online DG Interpretation resources, including the Speech Repository. The day concluded with a visit to the interpreting booths in one of the meeting rooms in the Centre de Conférences Albert Borschette, where Cathy and Marta showed the group how the interpretation process is performed.

On Friday 27 May, the group was welcomed by Ekaterina Naos, programme manager for DG Translation study visits, who had put together a schedule of most interesting presentations for the day. After a presentation on DG Translation, the group attended talks on terminology, translation tools and workflow, web translation and editing, recruitment and traineeships, freelance translation, and clear-writing.

The group had lunch with staff translators, who very kindly answered questions and expressed their views on the profession. The day ended with a particular highlight: The group visited a staff translator’s office and had the opportunity to look over his shoulder and discuss issues of the translation he was performing.

On Saturday 28 May, the group attended open day events at the European Council and the European Commission. This comprised a schedule of events and activities providing the opportunity to tour the European Council’s Justus Lipsius building and to learn more about the history of the European Union and the different Member States. The students also had the chance to practise their interpreting skills in the official interpreting booths, interpreting for a Q&A session between members of the public and EU officials in the Berlaymont building, the European Commission’s headquarters.

The participants found the three-day visit very useful and exciting. One of the real highlights of the visit was the opportunity to practise in the interpreting booths at the European Commission’s open day. They very much appreciated the kindness and help of the event organisers and the openness and generosity of the interpreters and translators they talked to, and found their differing and varied views on the profession most enlightening. It was also extremely interesting for the students to hear about the different routes into the profession of the various interpreters and translators. The trip was also a great opportunity for the students to get to know each other better and to explore and learn more about the fascinating city of Brussels. They felt that the visit had helped to further clarify which direction they would like to take their own careers in and they highly recommended that the department should organise similar trips in the future to enhance the student experience, students’ future studies and their employability prospects.

All participants are very grateful to their hosts at DG Interpretation and DG Translation for making the study visit such a valuable experience, and to Middlesex University Students’ Union, the University’s Exchanges Office and the Head of the University’s Education department for the support and funding provided. Finally, it is very pleasing to note that the trip has already turned out as particularly successful for one of the students in the group, who has just been offered a five-month traineeship in the Language Service of the General Secretariat of the Council of the EU. She will be back in Brussels by the end of the summer.

Visit to DG Translation

Visit to DG Translation

*

Visit to DG Interpreting

Visit to DG Interpreting

 

Niall Sellar: Translating fiction for the first time

25 March 2016

Babylon Berlin

Centre for Education Research and Scholarship

Interpreting and Translation Seminars

Middlesex University

12 April 2016, at 12:00, Room W149 (Williams Building)

Niall Sellar: Translating fiction for the first time

‘After five years spent trying and failing to carve a career in literary translation, I was ready to turn my attention to something new. Then in January 2015 an email arrived in my junk folder: would I be willing to translate the first in a series of successful German crime novels into English? How did this offer come about? And what are the challenges associated with being a first-time translator of an author whose work has never appeared in English?’

Niall Sellar

Born Edinburgh 1984

BA (Hons) German with French, Trinity College Dublin, 2008

MSc Translation Studies, University of Edinburgh, 2010

New Books in German Emerging Translators 2012

Babylon Berlin will be published in May 2016

**

For further information please contact Dr Abele Longo, MA Translation Programme Leader, a.longo@mdx.ac.uk